Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship

  • Dubawa sends forth 2021 fact-checking fellows

    The Centre for Journalism Innovation and Development (CJID), formerly Premium Times Center for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ),  through its fact-checking platform, Dubawa,  will on Friday send forth fellows of its  2021 fact checking fellowship cohort.

    The fellowship will come to a close at an award and dinner event, slated to hold at Corinthian Villa Hotel, Garki Abuja, on Friday, February 25.

    This 2021 cohort is the third set of fellows to graduate since the platform initiated the fellowship in 2019.

    The six-month fellowship, inspired by the need to tackle the menace of misinformation and disinformation in West Africa  and beyond, started in May 2021 and came to an end in November 2021.

    The fellowship was organised by the Centre for Journalism Innovation and Development (CJID) for journalists in new media platforms (online blogs), radio and TV stations in Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Liberia and The Gambia with the aim of writing truth-based and factual stories and also to institute a culture of fact-checking in newsrooms across West Africa.

    At the dinner and award ceremony, some fellows will be awarded based on their performance throughout the fellowship.

    Speaking on the importance of the fellowship, the current Acting Executive Director of the organisation, Dr Tobi Oluwatola, said he is proud of what the fellowship stands for.

    “Verification is central to the work of accountability journalism that advances democratic values. We at CJID are proud of the work that this year’s fellows have done and continue to do in their various newsrooms,” he said.

    Similarly, the Dubawa West Africa manager, Caroline Anipah, is hopeful the fellows will continue to make use of what they learnt during the fellowship.

    “This year’s fellowship, as always, has been largely successful. For the first time since it started, we’ve had fellows join us from Liberia and, like their counterparts in the other countries, their contributions have been enormous. We are sad to see them go but we believe they have been adequately equipped, with the mentorship they’ve undergone in the six months of the fellowship, to tackle misinformation and disinformation in their respective countries. We are still on hand to assist them in whatever way we can,” she said.

    In the same vein, the editor of Dubawa, Kemi Busari, expressed delight at the successful completion of the fellowship. He wants the fellows to continue to propagate the idea of fact-checking beyond the fellowship.

    “These fellows have gone through training and mentorship in the past months, we hope the knowledge gained doesn’t stop there. We want them to train other colleagues, set up fact-checking desks and propagate widely the idea of fact-checking in their local communities,” he said.

    The 2021 Dubawa fellowship was sponsored by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). 

  • Dubawa writers, fellows shortlisted for African Fact-Checking Awards

    Some writers and fellows of West Africa independent verification platform, Dubawa, have been shortlisted as finalists for the 2021 African Fact-checking Awards. 

    In the Working Journalist category, Dubawa writers, Maxine Danso and Silas Jonathan, alongside Ghana’s Programme Officer, Caroline Anipah, were shortlisted for a collaborative fact check they entered for the fact-checking award. 

    In the fact check article, the writers analysed a video where it was claimed that the Ghanaian President was caught on tape accepting a bribe in 2017. The video was shared several times and continued to circulate at a time when the country’s presidential election was approaching. Their findings showed that the claim was false and the viral video was doctored.

    Two other journalists affiliated to Dubawa were also shortlisted in the Working Journalist category.

    Kunle Adebajo, a 2020 fellow, who works with HumAngle, was shortlisted for his fact-check on an alleged military raid of Boko Haram enclave. Elizabeth Ogunbamowo of SaharaReporters, a 2021 fellow, was shortlisted for her fact-check on the claim that Twitter does not recognise President Muhammadu Buhari.

    The African Fact-checking Award, which is in its eighth year, is famous for annually appreciating and promoting fact-checking journalism in Africa. The organisers say the 2021 call received 216 entries from 28 countries, an increase from last year which recorded 192 entries from 27 African countries.

    The awards programme received entries for both Fact-Check of the Year by a Working Journalist and Fact-Check of the Year by a Student Journalist categories. 

    The winners and runners-up from each category will be announced at the awards ceremony, which will be held on Tuesday 12 October, during the African Investigative Journalism Conference.

  • My third month as a Dubawa fellow – Setting Sails

    They say time flies when you’re having fun; well, I never truly grasped it until I realised that three months had gone out of my six months postdoctoral fellowship with Dubawa. My first month reawakened my love for journalism practice, while my second month was very productive and full of many life lessons. But I wanted to do more than fact-checking. I wanted to explore all that Dubawa has to offer and so, I decided to be adventurous by departing from my pattern in the two previous months of the fellowship.

    The first thing I did was to go discuss information disorder on Radio Lagos 107.5FM. Radio Lagos is a predominantly Yoruba speaking station and I deliberately pitched my topic to the station because I realised that we focus our advocacies on English speaking platforms, forgetting that non-English media also have a very large audience base that needs to be enlightened about information disorder. I was invited to the station’s flagship morning magazine programme, Oju Taye on August 11th, 2021. We discussed the significant work Dubawa is doing to curb information disorder in Nigeria, how Nigerians can avoid information disorder, and the implications of the Federal Government’s recent media regulation policies, using information disorder as a justification. The programme was so exciting, and people called in with questions and suggestions. The high point for me was the fact that I was able to sustain close to 40 minutes of critical discussion in Yoruba Language. Trust me, I was apprehensive about how I was going to pull it off, but I did! We need more indigenous language media, we need to protect our languages and it’s rather sad that a foreign medium appears to be the one that is cashing in on the opportunities of indigenous language broadcasting in Nigeria, using digital media.

    The feedback I received from my media appearance highlighted the need to educate people on how to avoid sharing misinformation, especially on social media. So I wrote my first explainer for Dubawa on the same topic. Researching that topic was very insightful for me, and it highlighted the need for everyone to be more deliberate about how we create and share information, particularly on social media. The truth is, good intentions do not prevent the repercussions of misdeeds. The fact that we (mostly) do not intend to spread misinformation that can affect people and even the society at large does not prevent the harm from happening. 

    The high point of August 2021 for me was facilitating a Masterclass that trained close to 100 Lagos State University Campus Journalists and communication students on fact-checking and information disorder. The Masterclass was jointly hosted by Lagos State University (LASU) School of Communication and Dubawa/Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism. The immediate past president of the Association of Communication Scholars and Professionals of Nigeria, Prof. Lai Oso, presented a keynote address on the role of youths in curbing information disorder while Dubawa’s Audience Engagement Officer/Researcher, Lateef Sanni, taught the students how to fact-check. To assure the students they could start applying all they had learnt right away even as undergraduates, Peoples Check’s Sultan Quadri and Oluwaseye Ogunsanya explained how they have successfully combined their studentship with fact-checking and curbing information disorder.

    The participants at the fact-checking masterclass were so excited that I knew it shouldn’t end with a one-day training session. So I pitched the idea of floating a LASU Fact-Checkers Club to the trainees and they all agreed to join. We created a WhatsApp group, the Dean of School of Communication, Prof Sunday Alawode, gave his approval and we’re already up and running, while we take care of the registration with the University. Effectively, just like Dubawa is Nigeria’s first indigenous fact-checking organisation and the only one that is recognised by the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN), Lagos State University has become the first higher institution in Nigeria to establish a Fact-Checkers Club (Don’t fact-check it!) – at least we don’t have any information about any other university or polytechnic with a similar club at the moment.

    But that’s not the only pace LASU is setting. Based on my proposal, LASU Radio 95.7FM will also be adding a 15-minutes discussion segment to its Monday morning magazine programme to discuss the fact-checks and media literacy articles published by Dubawa the week before. This way, we get to spread the message to those who are unable to read online, as research has shown that most people do not get to see the fact-checks of the false information they have been exposed to, while those who do read, do not always change their minds. This programme will really help in curbing information disorder in Lagos State.

    People in academia (especially those in the humanities) know that a lot of journals set early September as paper submission deadlines, and I had a few that were too good to lose, so a good part of August was dedicated to meeting two deadlines. And the results submission and project deadlines were in August ending – so my hands were really full. But I just couldn’t let the entire month go by without writing any fact-checks, so I squeezed in two fact-checks before the end of August. The first was jointly written with another fellow, while I was the sole author for the second, which investigated some bogus gynaecological claims purportedly by Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH).

    I will rate this month the best so far because, in my third month, I have been able to build enduring foundations that I will build on when my six-month fellowship with Dubawa is over. I am now so invested in researching and curbing information disorder and that is not going to change even after the conclusion of this fellowship. I see myself responding to conference, journal and book chapter calls for papers with abstracts targeted at studying information disorder, and it is intriguing how my research trajectory which previously focused on media and gender has now expanded to include information disorder. I will be hosting a panel on Information Disorder and Women as part of the African Women in Media (AWiM) conference in November, 2021 and this is a significant indication of how Dubawa’s Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship 2021 has influenced my research praxis. I’ll share the information about how you can join in my next experience article, so do keep this in mind.

    Thank you for experiencing the first half of my six-month fellowship with me. I am certain the last half will be a blast. Dubawa has directed me on a research and practice path and I am setting sail. Are you coming on board?

  • 17 academics for Dubawa research, post-doctoral fellowship

    Seventeen academics have been selected for the 2021 research fellowship of West Africa’s fact-checking platform, Dubawa.

    The 17 selected from four West African countries comprise six post-doctoral and 11 research fellows.

    They were selected from over 71 applications received from The Gambia, Sierra Leone, Ghana and Nigeria. Ten of the fellows were from Nigeria, four from Ghana, two from The Gambia and one from Sierra Leone.

    “The fellows, in the next couple of months, are expected to create robust knowledge on issues around fact-checking with a key focus on the sub-region,” PTCIJ’s Executive Director, Dapo Olorunyomi, said on the enlarged research intake for the year.

    He added that some thematic areas have been identified to serve as guides for the fellows.

    In a hybrid form, the fellows were between 26 and 28 May trained on fact-checking and engaged on selected thematic areas of research.

    Now in its third year, the 2021 fellowship is christened Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship in honour of Ghanaian Professor, Kwame Karikari.

    Earlier in May, Dubawa trained twenty-six (26) fact-checking fellows across the sub-region.

    About DUBAWA

    DUBAWA is an independent, transparent, and non-partisan verification and fact-checking platform, initiated by the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ) in 2018.

    Dubawa aims at instituting a culture of truth and verification in public discourse and journalism through strategic partnerships between the media, government, civil society organisations, technology giants, and the public.

    Follow Dubawa on:

    Twitter: DubawaNG, DubawaGH, DubawaSL

    Facebook: Dubawa

    Website: www.Dubawa.org

    Instagram: Dubawa_official

    LinkedIn: Dubawa

    For more information about the Fellowship, contact us: [email protected]

  • Early education panacea to growing misinformation – OSIWA’s Executive Director, Osori

    Executive Director of the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA), Ayisha Osori, has prescribed early education as a potent tool in tackling growing misinformation and disinformation in Nigeria.

    Ms Osori, while giving opening remarks at the Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship said building a questioning attitude in children would culminate in a culture of seeking truth from early life.

    The fellowship, now in its third year, is a brain child of West Africa’s verification and fact-checking platform, Dubawa, under the auspices of the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ).

    The lawyer cum communication strategist advised that inculcating fact-checking into schools’ curriculum would help children discern the rudiments of truth and spur them to verify every information they come across. 

    “All these things are things that only a sound education can work against and that is part of the reason why you are here….,” she said addressing the fellows. “Child education to help them discern, to ask the question that you as adults would be asking yourself, is this true, is this correct? Can I verify it, does it make sense….”

    She branded the fellowship, which is now in its third year, as part of the overall education solution to tackling the menace of information disorder.

    “You are undertaking one of the most crucial tasks in the world today. Am I talking about the COVID-19? Well not that pandemic, but you all will be dealing with a different kind of pandemic with similar powers to destabilise us. We are talking about the weaponization of information and the ascendancy of doubt which can only be managed with rigorous fact-checking.”

    She further tasked the fellows on accurate fact-checking to sustain democracy which she noted is currently in the middle of a wave of misinformation and disinformation.

    “Misinformation has become one of the preferred instruments for discrediting the institutions of democracy, influencing the behaviour of voters, exploiting diversity and insecurities and creating disunity. As democracy progresses across the globe right now we are definitely in the middle of a wave where the wave is going down, and of course, we know it’s going to go up but while it is down, we have to do anything we can do”.

    The Dubawa 2021 fellowship now christened Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship in honour of Ghanaian Professor, Kwame Karikari, is the third with its first in 2019.

    This year’s fellowship has twenty-six (26) fellows inducted with the aim of combating misinformation in the sub-region. Participants were drawn from Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, The Gambia and Liberia.

  • Dubawa kickstarts training for third cohort of fact-checking fellows

    West Africa’s verification and fact-checking platform, Dubawa, has commenced training for its third cohort of  fact-checking fellows.

    The Dubawa fellowship, now christened Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship in honour of Ghanaian Professor, Kwame Karikari, is now in its third year.

    The 2021 fellowship inducted twenty-six (26) fellows to combat misinformation in the sub region with participants from Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, The Gambia and Liberia. 

    The first day of the four day training commenced on Tuesday, May 18, 2021 on Zoom with opening remarks by Ayisha Osori, Executive Director OSIWA. 

    Osori touched on the different forms of misinformation noting how misinformation has become one of the preferred instruments for discrediting the institutions of democracy  and influencing voter behaviour, exploiting insecurities  and diversity and creating disunity.

    She further shed light on how information and data has been weaponized, the ascendency of doubt and the crucial role journalists and fact-checkers have to play in leveling the playing field.

    She prompted participants to think more strategically about disinformation with focus on who benefits from it and who sews it.

    She added that “facts are our best defense, as well as a systematic education…”, and called on participants to take up the role in fighting disinformation with truth.

    Oluwatosin Alagbe, Programme Director at Premium Times Center for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ) introduced the workings of Dubawa to the participants and thanked all the facilitators for taking out time for the training.

    The first session on accountability journalism and the role of the fourth estate in West Africa was taken by the Executive Director of PTCIJ and publisher Premium Times, Dapo Olorunyomi. 

    The session captured journalists role in democracy building and development, anchored by the four main elements of journalism; accuracy and facts, verifiable claims, independence of agency and overwhelming public interest.

    The second session, led by Peter Cunliffe-Jones, Founder of Africa Check, and Senior Adviser at the International Fact-checking Network (IFCN), covered information disorder and Legal responses to misinformation.

    He also looked at  how information disorder can be fixed drawing information from a study that examined 11 African countries between 2016 and 2020.

    He noted that the goal is to curb false information’s harmful effects, not the freedom of expression.

    The third session still facilitated by Peter Cunliffe-Jones focused on the 6 C’s-Knowledge and Skills of misinformation literacy.

    He highlighted  media misinformation literacy as “an antidote to fake news”.

  • Dubawa inducts 26 fact-checkers for 2021 West Africa-wide fellowship

    West Africa’s verification and fact-checking platform, Dubawa, has concluded plans to induct twenty-six (26) fellows into its 2021 cohort of fact-checkers to combat misinformation in the sub-region.

    The platform, under the aegis of the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ), announced the commencement of the yearly fellowship in Abuja on Monday 17th May, 2021. 

    Now in its third year, the 2021 fellowship is christened Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship in honour of Ghanaian Professor, Kwame Karikari.

    Twenty-six (26) successful applicants, drawn from over 200 applications in The Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, will from Tuesday, 18th May undergo training that will equip them in combating the widespread regime of misinformation in the West African sub-region.

    “Upon completion and evidence of competence after a ten-course module the participants will graduate into the six months in-country fellowship,” Dubawa programme manager, Adedeji Adekunle, said in a statement.

    Mr Adekunle said the training faculty for the programme are drawn from a pool of the leading global experts in the field of fact-checking who come with individual and organizational talents which includes Peter Cunliffe-Jones, founder of Africa Check, and current course co-director/researcher at the University of Westminster in the United Kingdom; Youri van der Weide, researcher and trainer at the global investigative organisation, Bellingcat; and Craig Silverman, author, trainer, and the digital editor, at BuzzFeed.

    Others are Prof. Kwame Karikari, former professor, School of Communications, University of Ghana, Legon and Chairman of the Board of the Daily Graphic newspaper in Accra; Dr Chido Onumah, coordinator of the African Centre for Information and Media Literacy, AFRICMIL; Kemi Busari, Editor of DUBAWA; Deji Adekunle, DUBAWA Programme Manager; Caroline Anipah, Ghana Programme Lead for DUBAWA; and Dapo Olorunyomi, Executive Director for the PTCIJ.

    Participants at the course will learn about the accountability journalism ecosystem in the sub-region; how to fix the current information disorder through legal, regulatory responses and through misinformation literacy. 

    They will also learn fact-checking methodology, the skills and steps involved in fact-checking, ethics of journalism and fact-checking; data presentation and analysis for fact-checking, media literacy, monitoring and analysis of social media content and accounts; investigating websites, as well as freedom of information/right to Information laws in West Africa and the verification of digital tools.

    Named after Professor Kwame Karikari, redoubtable media freedom advocate and founder of the Media Foundation for West Africa (MFWA), the fellowship is inspired by the need to tackle the menace of mis- and dis-information within the sub-region and beyond.

    The Nigerian Cohort of this fellowship is Supported by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).

    About DUBAWA:

    DUBAWA is an independent, transparent and non-partisan verification and fact-checking platform, initiated by the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ) in 2018.

    Dubawa aims at instituting a culture of truth and verification in public discourse and journalism through strategic partnerships between the media, government, civil society organisations, technology giants and the public.

    Follow Dubawa on:

    Twitter: DubawaNG, DubawaGH, DubawaSL

    Facebook: Dubawa

    Website: www.Dubawa.org

    Instagram: Dubawa_official

    LinkedIn: Dubawa

    For more information about the Fellowship, contact us: [email protected]

  • The FactChecker

    CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship

    Inspired by the need to tackle and curb the rapid spread of mis- and dis-information and further expand the art and reach of verified and accurate information to rural and urban societies, to institutionalize a culture of fact-checking across the globe, and to build knowledge around the menace of information disorder in Africa, the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ), through its fact-checking project, DUBAWA, is now accepting applications for her Kwame Karikari fact-checking and research fellowship. 

    Named after Professor Kwame Karikari, redoubtable media freedom advocate and founder of the Media Foundation for West Africa, MFWA, both the Fact-Checking and Research Fellowships are designed to promote accountability of public institutions, institutionalize the art and culture of fact-checking in newsrooms, and build knowledge around the phenomenon in the Anglophone axis of the West African sub-region. This edition of the fellowship is the third in its series. 

    The twin-track programme offers a six-months fellowship for journalists (fact-checkers) to incorporate fact-checking into their work; and another six-month fellowship for scholars (researchers) to conduct original research for publication in contribution to building knowledge around information disorder. 

    The fellowships are supported by  the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the Heinrich Boll Stiftung Foundation (HBS), and they both offer a monthly stipend to cover all costs of the investigation and research project for fellows.

    Apply here

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    #FakeNewsAlert

    There’s precious little that we can do about the barrage of misinformation that we see daily, but there’s a lot we can do together if we learn to identify suspicious claims in the news and refrain from fuelling the fire by spreading them! Here are our top picks of likely-to-be-false news which [sadly] couldn’t be fact-checked.

    CLAIM: “Do not sleep with your earpiece on, d battery in the phone triggers a reaction that leads to death.” SOURCE: A Screenshot on WhatsApp

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    Questions to ask yourself: Who is the source? How credible is he/she? Is there a study backing this claim? What is the connection between an earpiece plugged in a phone and the phone’s battery? What kind of reaction does the phone battery cause?

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  • CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Kwame Karikari Fact-Checking and Research Fellowship

    Inspired by the need to tackle and curb the rapid spread of mis- and dis-information and further expand the art and reach of verified and accurate information to rural and urban societies, to institutionalize a culture of fact-checking across the globe, and to build knowledge around the menace of information disorder in Africa, the Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism (PTCIJ), through its fact-checking project, DUBAWA, is now accepting applications for her Kwame Karikari fact-checking and research fellowship. 

    Named after Professor Kwame Karikari, redoubtable media freedom advocate and founder of the Media Foundation for West Africa, MFWA, both the Fact-Checking and Research Fellowships are designed to promote accountability of public institutions, institutionalize the art and culture of fact-checking in newsrooms, and build knowledge around the phenomenon in the Anglophone axis of the West African sub-region. This edition of the fellowship is the third in its series. 

    The twin-track programme offers a six-months fellowship for journalists (fact-checkers) to incorporate fact-checking into their work; and another six-month fellowship for scholars (researchers) to conduct original research for publication in contribution to building knowledge around information disorder. 

    The fellowships are supported by  the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the Heinrich Boll Stiftung Foundation (HBS), and they both offer a monthly stipend to cover all costs of the investigation and research project for fellows.

    Fact-checking Track

    The fact-checking track is open to journalists and reporters in traditional and new media. Experience in fact-checking is not required of prospective applicants for the fact-checking track. However, prospective  applicants must:

    • Be journalists in new media platforms (online blogs), print media, radio, and TV stations in Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and The Gambia.
    • Be interested in pursuing fact-checking of stories pertaining to politics, economy, health, governance, business, media etc.
    • Be willing to think about ways to expand the reach of verified information to grassroots communities that are targeted constituencies for political, social, and cultural disinformation. 
    • Have proficient computer skills.
    • Be working in a media organization willing to cross publish with Dubawa.

    Selected applicants will be expected to:

    • Write (online and print media) or broadcast (radio and TV) three (3) fact-check stories related to politics, health, economy, media etc. And one (1) media literacy article/ explainer on a monthly basis. 
    • Promote fact-checking on all social media, print, online, radio, or TV platforms as necessary.
    • Train colleagues in their newsrooms on the theory and practice of fact-checking.
    • Assist their newsroom to set up fact-checking desks upon completion of the programme.
    • Cross-publish fact-check reports on their platform and Dubawa.

    Journalists and reporters from local language speaking media organisations are encouraged to apply to join this year’s fellowship.

    If selected, the applicant(s) must provide proof of approval from the newsroom that authorizes the applicant to undertake fact-checking work and provide an assurance that fact-checks will be widely circulated on their media platform, newspapers, as well as on Dubawa’s websites as well.

    Scholars (Research) Track

    The Research Fellowship Programme is initiated through Dubawa’s, Information Disorder Analysis Centre (IDAC), a Project which creates knowledge on the information disorder ecosystem through extensive research, following an identification of gaps in knowledge that should drive policy and democratic discourse around technological consequences, social media, and political legislation. This track is open to postdoctoral and graduate/research fellows. 

    Prospective applicants for this track must choose from one of the following areas during the fellowship:

    • Policy on Press Freedom
    • Politics and its influences on the information disorder ecosystem
    • Policy on social media, data, and new-age technology. 
    • Social media, legacy media, and audience communication behaviours
    • Nature, perception, and impact of information disorder

    Who can apply for this fellowship?

    Prospective applicants must: 

    • Be graduates, postgraduate students, post-doctoral candidates, or persons who work in academia in Ghana,  Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and The Gambia
    • Have at least intermediate level of IT skills 
    • Have good analytical skills 
    • Possess wide and demonstrable prior-experience in conducting research (on any subject).
    • Have genuine interest in learning and contributing to the development of knowledge around the IDAC project.
    • Be willing to give sufficient time or attention to the fellowship.
    • Be willing to meet up with the required deliverables. 

    Applicants who are post-doctoral researchers must commit to:

    • Carry out six months of research into any of the identified focus areas. 
    • Be part of Dubawa’s workflow, attending editorial team meetings.
    • Give a public lecture on any of the focus areas relevant to their research while in residence at IDAC.
    • To publicize and share results of findings with the general public.

    Applicants who are graduate and postgraduate researchers must commit to:

    • To carry out research into any of the identified areas 
    • Host a monthly or bi-monthly webinar on the findings of their research and give a lecture under the auspices of IDAC’s Occasional Webinar Series.
    • Make radio appearances at various stages of both fellowships to bring to the fore the issues raised or identified by the research efforts. 
    • Provide monthly analytical articles showing the interim findings of the research being conducted in the first five months and the final product at the end of the sixth month.

    Note: All applicants will go through two stages of selection: filling an application form and attending a virtual interview.

    Fellowship Timelines

    Application Starts: 23 April – 7 May 2021 

    Selection and interviews: 10 – 14 May 2021

    Training (Fact-checkers): Tuesday 18 – Friday 21 May

    Discussion Forum (Researchers): 25 – 26 May 2021

    Fellowship Program Begins/Ends: May – November 2021

    How to Apply

    Applicants who are certain they meet the above criteria should click the appropriate link below to apply:

    For Fact-checking, CLICK HERE

    For Research, CLICK HERE

    For more information about the Fellowship, contact us at [email protected]  Follow us on social media;

    Instagram: Dubawa_official

    Facebook: Dubawa

    Twitter: DubawaNGDubawaGHDubawaSL

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