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NO! Boko Haram Did Not Give South African Government A 24-Hour Ultimatum.

Photo Credit: Vanguard 3 mins read

Claim: Viral image and a publication claim Boko Haram threatened to kill South Africans over xenophobic attacks and issued a 24-hour ultimatum to their government.

FALSE: Yes, some Nigerians in South Africa beckoned on the Islamic sect for vigilante justice. However, there is no evidence of the group responding; much less giving the South African government a  24-hr ultimatum. More so, this claim has not been published by any credible media outlet. At best, it is the personal opinions of a few misguided individuals. Hence, this is to be disregarded until new opposing credible intel surfaces.

Full Text: 

Boko Haram is the Islamic sect responsible for so many attacks aimed at the Nigerian government and its citizens at large. We recall their mission statement, the purification of Islam in Northern Nigeria. This is witnessed by their radical activities not limited to the mass abduction of Chibok school girls and Dapchi students. Several inhumane atrocities have been linked to the sect. Hence, the veracity of this claim is called into question. Consequent on their (Boko Haram) track record, can we say this asserted vigilante crusade is their new m.o.?

Verification

The recent publication by The South African explain how Nigerians in South Africa are beckoning on the sect for vigilante justice.

This is corroborated by the video found of a man lamenting on the xenophobic attacks saying: 

“Boko Haram must come to this country, the Government of this country are aware of what is happening. We will call for revenge our Government will call for revenge. Boko Haram or whatever must to come to this country…”

Interviewee- Youtube video transcript

Enter, the publication by Jbaynews. This post further asserts Boko Haram responded and issued a 24-hour ultimatum to the South African government.

Background… Recent Xenophobia Attacks.

Following the recent attack on foreigners by South Africans, several media publications and reports have surfaced. Notable platforms include: BBC, Aljazeera, Premium Times, Punchng Daily Trust amongst others.

It did not start today, however…

Xenowatch, a tool that monitors xenophobic attacks, threats or violence across  South Africa, gives data on past xenophobic incidences in South Africa so far.

Evidently this has been an issue for over a decade. This forms the bedrock for seemingly recent stories to churn out disinformation. Sources show that “recent” media are anything but. In one instance a video shared showing the killing of a man by an angry mob for alleged robbery actually took place on January 15. 

Other examples include a report by Sahara Reporters, on September 3rd, 2019. In said publication, the image used dates back to 23rd February 2017  as reported by BBC. In the same vein, Premium Times also reported how the Foreign affairs minister debunked the fact that any Nigerian live was lost in the recent attack.

Ultimately, there is no denying that they aren’t xenophobic attacks; they just are not recent. And with regards to Jbaynews publication, it is baseless with no verification.

Conclusion

Yes, some Nigerians in South Africa beckoned on the Islamic sect for vigilante justice. However, there is no evidence of the group responding; much less giving the South African government a  24-hr ultimatum. More so, this claim has not been published by any credible media outlet. At best, it is the personal opinions of a few misguided individuals. Hence, this is to be disregarded until new opposing credible intel surfaces.

Temilade Onilede is a researcher and the Programme Assistant for Dubawa, Nigeria. She holds an undergraduate degree in Performing Arts From the University of Ilorin, Ilorin Kwara State. She is a trained journalist, with good research and writing skills, coupled with her knowledge in Journalism; a personable character and an engaging mind who is well skilled in the field of fact-checking and verification.

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